This site uses cookies Learn More

General Discussion

787
68
majorp
majorp
15 Nov 2018 10:28

Who got us into this fine mess?

burneside
burneside
15 Nov 2018 12:59

Ted Heath in 1973.

6 Agrees
Scapegoat
Scapegoat
15 Nov 2018 16:58

pffft

majorp
majorp
15 Nov 2018 17:55

@burnside     --------- Correct, and I wonder how many other contributors to this site got it right.

I remember it well and at the time my thoughts were, can't we control ourselves. Now we are locked into something, that it appears is difficult to get out of.

Like donald Trump says about America, we should be saying about the uk.

 

 

leatash
leatash
15 Nov 2018 18:37

What we had in 1973 is not what we have now i wonder if we could have foreseen the future if we would have ever joined.

Calamari
Calamari
15 Nov 2018 19:20

Who got us into this fine mess?

 

The racists who voted out, that's who!

 

I voted against entering the EC back in the 70's but accepted the fact that now we are in, let's make the most of it.

 

I'm standing by for lot's of abuse now.

wondering
wondering
15 Nov 2018 20:15

All the first time voters will think twice when the EU form the' EU Army' ..they will be called to serve anywhere the EU say. 

leatash
leatash
15 Nov 2018 20:48

Why are those who voted out racist may it be that you are confusing racism with immigration the two have no connection whatsoever.

3 Agrees
Lostit
Lostit
15 Nov 2018 23:03

@majorp : we are not locked into anything. All that has been done so far is the cabinet, on 14/11/18, agreed on the text for delivery to the EU Commission, for that body to accept or reject. This then has to go before the House to be accepted by parliament. As it stands today, 15/11/18, the UK is in the EU. If you have listened to the commentary from today, by numerous MPs/analylists/etc, this agreed text will be rejected by the Commission for one and second, the House will not pass it into law. The agreed text, call it Chequers 2.0, is again dead in the water. The voting maths of the House will not add up to a successful vote for the PM.  We are in the same 'place' as of the day after the referendum result.

@wondering : The UK is already part of a non-national 'army'; NATO. Under NATO rules the UK is obliged to send serving military personnel where NATO determines. And yet you do not seem to find this objectionable?

@leatash : immigration is primarily the movement of people from one country to another for permenant/temporary residence. Racism is the subjective result by the destination country's resident population where, in any, population you have racists. In an interview on Radio 4 this lunch time with a Tory MP he stated (and I paraphrase) when travelling around my constituancy (it was in the North of the country,  I can't  remember where) people told him they had voted Leave to to stop the free movement of people (immigration), to stop the monies being paid to the EU and to remove the juristiction of the ECJ (European Court of Justice). They did not mention the customs union or trade or, in majority, anything else. To my interpretation this validation of their votes is slightly tainted with zenophobia which isn't far from racism.  Immigration and racism are inextricably connected.

 

 

 

1 Agree
Lynne
Lynne
16 Nov 2018 07:33

I wonder how many people in England, Wales and Scotland thought about Brexit and its impact and complications with regard to the island of Ireland. I know it didn't enter my head until the ramifications and complications of it all came to the fore after June 2016.

 

As I understand it.......... where the EU and a  non EU country has a border that border has to be a hard one. (there are customs checks on the border between Sweden and Norway for example).  Under WTO rules (which would come into play in the event of a hard, cliff edge, Brexit) there also have to be hard borders. But..........a legal (and for goodness sake let's not forget the psychological impact as well of there being a hard border between the RoI and N.I!!!) requirement of the Good Friday Agreement is that there should be no hard border between the RoI and NI . Which of course was/is no problem as long as both the UK and the RoI were/are in the same customs union/single market (the EU).   

 

 

So, we have an international treaty (the Good Friday Agreement) that says no hard border between the RoI (EU) and N.I (the UK).

But  under WTO rules, if we had a hard Brexit, there has to be a hard border between the RoI (EU) and N.I (the UK). 

And if we don't have a customs agreement of some kind with the EU then there also has to be a hard border between the RoI and N.I

 

 

If anyone has any ideas as to how this conundrum can be resolved please send them to 10 Downing Street.   

1 Agree
Lynne
Lynne
16 Nov 2018 08:45

More on Northern Ireland:

1. Majority of those who voted in N.I wished to Remain in the EU.

2. The Democratic Unionist Party (note the word Unionist) argued for Leave.

3. Since the outcome of the snap general election in 2017 the 10(?) DUP MPs have supported the Conservatives in parliament. Without the DUP MPs the Conservatives would not have a majority.

4. Both the Conservative Party and the DUP staunchly support the maintenance and continual existence of the UK. (the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland).

5. Therefore Northern Ireland shouldn't be treated any differently from the other countries that form the UK.

6. Although the DUP argued for Leave they also want a frictionless border with the RoI.

7. But if they have a frictionless border with the RoI (EU) and the other countries of the Uk don't, then NI will be different from the rest of the UK. 

8. So to keep all the countries comprising the UK in alignment trade/customs wise the whole of the Uk will need to have the same deal with the EU.   

9. See my comments in my post above this one.

10. "There's a whole in my bucket deal Liza, dear Liza, there's a whole in my bucket, dear Liza, a hole".  

     

 

1 Agree
majorp
majorp
16 Nov 2018 09:29

@Lostit. every one has there own opinion. if we are not locked in to anything, why do we need the negotiations to break away? the agreement that is on the table is so far the best that can be done for the moment.

There is free movement across the Irish border now, and so far it has worked well, because we are both in the EU. But, if we come out then the EU will dictate how that border is controlled, not us, because N.I, will be out and the rest of Ireland will still be under the same rules, regulations, laws and instructions as the rest of the EU. So if we are not locked in, please tell everyone how to get out.

burneside
burneside
16 Nov 2018 10:21

So Leave voters are all racists, the Remainers forgot to throw in the other usual insults; that we are all thick, uneducated, Daily-Mail-reading scum.  And if immigration and racism are inextricably linked, does that then mean every country in the world which has immigration rules is also racist?

 

2 Agrees
Lostit
Lostit
16 Nov 2018 21:57

burneside : Australia and the USA as 2 major developed countires that have immigration policies designed, or attempt too in the case of the US, favour the immigraton of white people. Most recently, Trump had his immigration policy regarding arab states over turned by the courts. And then there is his attitude to South Americans.  His support of White Supremacy, also, doesn't encourage a belief that his foreign policies would reflect any differing attitude.

Australia for decades had a policy that actively discouraged or disallowed people of colour to succeed in immigtation applications. This has been well documented. 

 

majorp : The solution to the Irish border probelm may well sort itself out, albeit in 20-30 years. It is predicted with almost 100% certainty that Northen Ireland will have a catholic population majority within 15-20 years.  If NI suffers from leaving Europe and especially so due to any or no agreement/deal being achieved, it's not a stretch of the imagination that the Catholic population and maybe some Prodestants, could be persuaded to follow a political party that promised a referendum for the unification of Eire and NI and in the EU by default.  Granted this is some way-a-way, but any 'Backstop' agreed to would last this long, also by default. If this happens, the prosepect of Scotland and maybe Wales also seeking independance (unless of course Scotland already is independant by this time) will increase by a huge factor.

Search "when will northern ireland catholic population overtake protestants?"

Lostit
Lostit
16 Nov 2018 21:59

burneside : you might find the Daily Mail will be taking a different stance on things from now on. It has a new editor, check today's front page (16/11/18). 

1 Agree
Lynne
Lynne
16 Nov 2018 22:51

@Lostit: back in the mid 1980s I remember a Northern Ireland nationalist telling me that the nationalists had but only to play the long game with regard to Irish unification. What did he mean? Well, as he pointed out to me with a smile - as a general rule Catholics have more children than Protestants. Thus over a period of time......... 

 

@All - info here https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-politics-44615404 re the Brexit Irish backstop proposal (see my postings on Ireland above)  

Lostit
Lostit
16 Nov 2018 23:54

^^

majorp
majorp
17 Nov 2018 03:09

Complete speclation by Lostit. It is all might, if's and maybe's. It is now that matters. SO HOW DO WE GET OUT?

We have more bargaining power that many of the other countries that are still in the EU. Our fisheries policy is scaring many who roam around in our waters freely now, but won't be able too when we leave There are many others that depend heavily on what we buy from them and are scared that when we leave, we will source our goods from elsewhere. Some of those countries that are still burning the EU flag are struggling now. They are worried, but the press does not seem interested in expressing their fears------YET.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

majorp
majorp
17 Nov 2018 03:14

The findings is sure to bolster the view among Brexiteers that there may be divisions on the EU side that can be exploited to Britain’s advantage in Phase 2 of the negotiations, which are due to start within weeks. So far, the EU has demonstrated rock-solid unity over the three divorce issues of citizens’ rights, the Brexit bill and the Northern Irish border. But that may be harder to sustain when talks touch on issues for which countries (and regions within countries) have differing interests.

EU leaders are aware of the danger. French President Emmanuel Macron warned on Friday that the EU27 must present a “united front” or risk an outcome “unfavorable to the European Union and thus to each one of us.”

“It is highly significant that other EU member states’ authorities are beginning to engage with the consequences of a no-deal Brexit because it is something that should concern them greatly,” said prominent Tory Brexiteer Bernard Jenkin. “I think the pressure is mounting on the EU negotiators to deliver a sensible deal which disrupts as little as possible.”

Lynne
Lynne
17 Nov 2018 07:53

A No Deal Brexit is a lose/lose outcome. 

So of course both sides are looking for a deal which disrupts as little as possible and to get to as near a win/win situation as is possible given all the issues involved.

But that could take more time than the March 2019 deadline allows for. 

 

Click on this link for a synopsis of what May is proposing https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46208764

majorp
majorp
17 Nov 2018 11:15

The question as I see it. What are the others thinking if there was a no deal and would they let it happen. I don't think so, as most of them have more to lose than we do. Who are we talking too in the negotiations, is it the EU as a whole or individual countries leaders or both?

Lynne
Lynne
17 Nov 2018 14:18

The negotiations are being led on the EU's part by Michel Barnier and his team. As well as the Uk government having to agree to whatever is being proposed as I understand the situation so too do all the governments of the remaining EU countries.

We could end up with No Deal by default and neither the Uk or the EU wants that.

But....... 

      

burneside
burneside
17 Nov 2018 16:17

Negotiations on the UK side are being conducted by Olly Robbins who was once Principal Private Secretary to Tony Blair, and while studying at Oxford  was president of the Oxford Reform Club, a group promoting a federal EU.  So we have a Remain Prime Minister and the chief negotiator is of the same ilk.  No wonder we are where we are. 

Michael Portillo made a very good point on Thursday's This Week programme:

“The EU has made a strategic error, short of marching PM May into a railway carriage in Compiègne Forest, they could not have produced a more humiliating surrender. “History tells us when you humiliate countries with a surrender, it doesn’t go well."

If Treason May somehow manages to get this deal through parliament, do not think for one moment it will be the end the matter. The battle to leave the EU will start afresh.

4 Agrees
Lynne
Lynne
17 Nov 2018 20:12

I thought I heard someone say it will all be over by Christmas.

 

Thing is though, they didn't say which one.......

1 Agree
leatash
leatash
17 Nov 2018 21:14

All i can say is roll on 11pm 29th March 2019 i have a big box of fireworks ready and waiting.

4 Agrees
Lostit
Lostit
17 Nov 2018 23:10

majorp : i am confused at to what you are refering to when you say we are locked into. When you wrote " Now we are locked into something, that it appears is difficult to get out of.", I took what you refer to us being locked into as being the new draft withdrawal agreement and the NI border problem. Is this correct? OR did you mean our actual EU membership?

Lynne
Lynne
18 Nov 2018 06:43

@ Leatash and I've got a big box full of food stuffs and over the counter medicines ready and waiting.......

1 Agree
leatash
leatash
18 Nov 2018 08:09

Fact we export 20% more medicines to the EU than we import and have you noticed that supermarkets are now selling more produce from  Argentina, South Africa, they will suffer just the same as us Lynne. 

Lynne
Lynne
18 Nov 2018 08:50

Short video here explaining Theresa May's proposed Brexit deal

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lE7nN0cgs9A 

lasts about 11 minutes. Ignore the ads that pop up every now and then.  

 

Can you give me a link concerning what you say concerning medicines please.  Thanks.  And even if you are correct, and I am not saying that you are not - then just because we export more medicine than we import does not mean that we produce all the types of medicine we need (hence the need to import it).     

majorp
majorp
18 Nov 2018 11:16

@ Lostt. I was not talking about the agreement, That came out after I said what I said and I am not psychic.

 

leatash
leatash
18 Nov 2018 15:14

The info came from a TV program reference Brexit and the NHS one of the interesting facts was 82% of insulin comes from the EU and the vast proportion from one factory in Germany the other interesting fact was that the PM is insulin dependant. But it was mentioned that the EU are also dependant on life saving drugs that are only manufactured in the UK so they have as much to lose as we have.

Lynne
Lynne
18 Nov 2018 17:37

Which is why, amongst other reasons, No Deal is a lose/lose situation. 

b.o.liking
b.o.liking
20 Nov 2018 14:50

If it's true we have no say on future decission making or  the right to veto. Maybe they would demand 

we surrender our entire Royal Navy fleet sailing it into a German or French port. Followed by a  document signing at 

a forest 40 odd miles North of Paris.  If Railway carriage available.

  

 

burneside
burneside
20 Nov 2018 15:28

Michael Portillo made the same analogy on last Thursday's This Week programme:

Mr Portillo said the European Union “humiliated” Britain in its Withdrawal Agreement which has been ridiculed by both Brexiteer and Remainer politicians.

Speaking on BBC This Week, Mr Portillo said: “I think the European Union has made a strategic error, short of marching Mrs May into a railway carriage in Compiègne Forest, they could not have produced a more humiliating surrender.

“And all of history tells us that when you humiliate countries with a surrender, it doesn’t go well thereafter.”

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1046225/Brexit-news-Theresa-May-UK-deal-EU-BBC-latest-vote-agreement-draft-explained

 

2 Agrees
majorp
majorp
20 Nov 2018 18:04

That is what he is saying, others are saying something different. Until we are out, we will never know who was right.

Lynne
Lynne
20 Nov 2018 19:29

And then it might be too late.......

majorp
majorp
20 Nov 2018 22:27

Too late for what?

Lynne
Lynne
21 Nov 2018 06:58

To find out what who was right and who was wrong.  

burneside
burneside
21 Nov 2018 11:24

We had over 40 years for the EEC/EC/EU to prove itself, and then the majority decided it wasn't worth it and they no longer wanted to be part of the club.  Unfortunately Treason May has other ideas, and we won't be leaving after all.

1 Agree
majorp
majorp
21 Nov 2018 13:10

Why won't we be leaving?

DEEDOODLE
DEEDOODLE
21 Nov 2018 14:18

In my opinion, those that actually run our country are more than likely quite happy with the way things are going. It's not much different to many wars/conflicts that have and are ongoing around the world and that is those at the top of the tree prosper in good and bad times, but more so when things are bad.

Again, in my opinion, the politicians are merely puppets to give the electorate a feeling that democracy does exist in this counrty. I believe the Brexit referendum had been a calculated project to put the issues of leaving the eu to bed, but for some reason things went very wrong for those that thought it up. Cameron was on his toes pretty sharpish when the results came in.

To tipfy how badly this country is you only have to look at the 2017 general election results and see how many seats snp got for the number of votes and their consequential power in the U.K. government decision making machine.

The U.K. needs a massive enema to purge the blockages that are stopping the country from working efficiently.

It may not be nice or smell good, but the end result may and I say may, no pun intended, be better than we have at the moment or not.

majorp
majorp
21 Nov 2018 14:56

Democracy substitutes election by the incompetent many for appointment by the corrupt few.

 

And

 

It was easier to know it than to explain why I knew it If you were asked to prove that two and two made four, you might find some difficulty, and yet you are quite sure of the fact.

 

That is why in my opinion, whether we stay or go, there will be difficulties somewhere but only in the short term.

 

p { margin-bottom: 0.25cm; line-height: 120%; }a:link { } p { margin-bottom: 0.25cm; line-height: 120%; }a:link { }
burneside
burneside
21 Nov 2018 14:57

The deal May has agreed means that because of the Irish border issue we remain tied to EU regulations until a satisfactory deal is found, that means, in effect, we need the Brussel's  permission to fully leave the EU.  Until then we cannot formulate our own independent trade policy and make trade deals around the world.  The EU does want a successful indepenent trading nation on its doorstep, it might encourage other members to do the same thing, and will do everything it can to keep us tied to its regulations.

May campaigned for the Remain side and has conned us all for the last two years into believing that she really meant "Brexit means Brexit" and "No deal is better than a bad deal".  They were just slogans to keep us quiet while behind the scenes her "negotiators" were doing everything possible to keep us in the EU's clutches.

Despite all the huffing and puffing from Labour, and the Tory rebels, I believe her deal will eventually get approved by parliament.  I sincerely hope I am proved wrong, and we leave without a deal next March.

 

 

2 Agrees
ER113
ER113
22 Nov 2018 15:01

Deedoodle once again lowers the tone of the debate. But, to stick to facts;

Conservatives needed about 43,000 votes for its 318 seats

Labour about 49,000 votes per seat for its 262 seats

The Liberals 198,000 votes per seat for its 12 seats

The SNP about 28,000 votes per seat 35 seats

The DUP about 29,000 votes per seat for its 10 seats

Sinn Fein about 34,000 votes for its 7 seats

The Greens about 525,000 votes per seat for its 1 seat

UKIP polled 593,000 votes for no seats

 

If we had a system that awarded seats on the basis of votes then the following would haved been the likely result based on 49,532 votes as the average for all seats

 

Conservatives 276 seats, Labour 260 seats, SNP 20 seats, Liberals 48 seats, DUP 6 seats, Sinn Fein 5 seats, Greens 11 seats, Ukip 12 seats

 

I am not sure what power the SNP have in the UK government decision making machine: maybe you could enlighten us all. I believe that the DUP has got influence?

 

 

2 Agrees
Lynne
Lynne
22 Nov 2018 17:51

DUP? They've cost Theresa May around about £1billion of UK (ie England's?)tax money and 10 Parliamentary seats worth of disproportionate influence as to how the Brexit negotiations have gone/are going/will go.  https://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/dup-deal-latest-how-much-extra-money-funding-theresa-may-conservative-tory-uk-taxpayers-a7809231.html

 

Now that's what I call clout.

 

(how many noughts in a billion? Just divide that by 10 to see how much each DUP seat has cost Theresa May (or us to be more precise) 

 

 

1 Agree
Scapegoat
Scapegoat
24 Nov 2018 00:48

Leavers=quiters=can't play if I take my ball home!

https://youtu.be/Qc7HmhrgTuQ

 

 

1263
1263
24 Nov 2018 10:27

 

Are the DUP not British ?  they are quite entitled to maximse political clout into revenue the same as the Welsh and Scots.  It's a mere  pittance compared  to having that loony Coyrbn and his stalinst momentum cronies in charge.

2 Agrees
Lynne
Lynne
24 Nov 2018 11:16

Redistribution of wealth eh? 

What an interesting concept.......... 

majorp
majorp
25 Nov 2018 10:05

This is the deal and all 27 other EU members have endorsed it. There is no other deal.

1 Agree
majorp
majorp
25 Nov 2018 11:39

Today is a sad day. we don't like the thought of Britain leaving.

Of course they don't, they will not be getting our money as we are one of the biggest contributors.

6 Agrees
burneside
burneside
25 Nov 2018 13:57

So we will be leaving without a deal then, May's treachery will not get through parliament and will bring about her demise.  Good stuff.

3 Agrees
majorp
majorp
25 Nov 2018 14:29

@burnside   You are not listening to the news then.

burneside
burneside
25 Nov 2018 15:53

I don't know what news you are following, but everything I am seeing says May's deal hasn't got a chance of being passed by parliament.  Leavers and Remainers are united in their condemnation of it.

3 Agrees
Lynne
Lynne
29 Nov 2018 09:06
Barbarawils68
Barbarawils68
30 Nov 2018 14:04

 

Trump and the Irish have the solution this from the Irish Times 27th November 2018 but they have to back a no deal Brexit to achieve it!

Trump’s tariff tactics could make no-deal Brexit work for Ireland

Security exemption in WTO rules could enable tariff-free cross-Border tr

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/trump-s-tariff-tactics-could-make-no-deal-brexit-work-for-ireland-1.3711188

 

Security exception

But there are exceptions to the scope of the WTO rules, including most importantly the “national security exception,” article 21 of the general agreement on tariffs and trade (Gatt): “Nothing in this agreement shall be construed . . . to prevent any contracting party from taking any action which it considers necessary for the protection of its essential security interests . . . taken in time of war or other emergency in international relations.”

US president Donald Trump has been using this exception to introduce aggressive tariffs against a variety of countries – often without any justification. But Britain could use the same clause in a perfectly justifiable manner to lower tariffs in the name of security rather than raising them.

The Taoiseach has argued very reasonably that any measures concerning the Border should be hard for the UK to reverse unilaterally. Accordingly, unilateral British opening under article 21 could be supplemented by a bilateral accord setting up an intergovernmental British-Irish commission (along the lines of several such institutions established by the Belfast Agreement) to monitor the security implications of reimposing tariffs on the Border – and the UK could commit itself to abiding by that commission’s recommendations concerning Border security. This arrangement would offer the British the possibility of a genuine Brexit that does not hurt Ireland while giving the Republic the assurance it needs that it would not be compromised by any unilateral reversal of the policy.

 

How might the EU respond to such a unilateral opening of the land border by the UK? Brussels is also committed to keeping an open border in Ireland for security reasons, so a unilateral opening of the land border by the UK should prompt a reciprocal opening by the EU. Contrary to received opinion, WTO rules thus offer the basis of a bespoke solution to the Irish problem, rather than posing an obstacle that threatens to derail Brexit altogether.

 

The rest of the article makes sense too.  It is worth a read.

Lynne
Lynne
30 Nov 2018 15:04

And the comments underneath the article are also an interesting read. Here is one of them.

 

The glaring hole in your argument is the problem of norms and standards, not tariffs. If there is a hard Brexit and the U.K lowers its food and health and safety standards to accommodate trade deals with the U.S, then we in the Republic will be obliged to police the border to protect the internal EU market from a flood of inferior products entering it through the UK. You seem oblivious to the fact that the Irish border will become an external EU border after Brexit. More Brexiteer magical thinking!

 « less

1 Agree
Lynne
Lynne
30 Nov 2018 16:45

and here is another interesting analysis of the Ireland conundrum (and how it might end up being resolved).

http://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/brexit/why-the-idea-of-a-united-ireland-is-back-in-play/ar-BBQimmL?ocid=iehp 

1 Agree
b.o.liking
b.o.liking
30 Nov 2018 18:08

Leave the E.U. with no deal  thats what we voted for and when Russia kicks off  over E.U. expansionism  in Crimea and the Ukraine, 

 We leave Our so called  Friends and Partners to be on thier own and leave NATO. AKA Go and Sod off.

We have sent our best young men and women before  to protect these ungrateful bastards.NEVER NEVER AGAIN! 

You are on your own. 

 

3 Agrees
b.o.liking
b.o.liking
30 Nov 2018 18:25

As for the Southern Irish is concerned ban their lorries from crossing into the UK and on to Dover and get them to send the goods 

by ferry around the mainland of Britain and direct to Europe.  Jobs a good'un.   

1 Agree
Lynne
Lynne
30 Nov 2018 20:49

So we are to leave the EU and NATO? 

I think we might be the ones who find ourselves on our own.

I wonder who would come to our rescue should we ever need it?  

leatash
leatash
30 Nov 2018 21:19

If there is ever a next time me thinks there will be no one left to come to our rescue.

majorp
majorp
30 Nov 2018 22:44

I am an optimist. Nobody knows what will happen. As far as I can see, everything is guesswork.Would it be better to stay in----I don't know. Is the deal on the table the best deal we could get-----I don't know.

If the deal is rejected, what will happen?------I don't know. What I do know is that the world is round, the sky will not fall in if any path that is taken.

Lynne
Lynne
01 Dec 2018 07:07
b.o.liking
b.o.liking
01 Dec 2018 08:16

HI Lynne   YES   Well don't rely on the French Dutch or if memory serves the Germans. Or are  you suffering the illness many  have of convenient

amnesia.

Lynne
Lynne
01 Dec 2018 08:51

From the link I've given above.

 

Experts have predicted it will cost an estimated £3bn to £5bn, and it is unclear whether the UK will get back the £1.2bn it sunk into the Galileo project.

 

Sky News reported on Thursday that government plans to build Britain's own system could hit the buffers because other countries have already claimed signal space.

 

Bleddyn Bowen, an expert in space policy at Leicester University, told Sky News that the entire spectrum of usable radio frequencies has been shared out between the countries, with no spare capacity.

"If Britain wants to build its own system it would have to get all those countries to agree where to take spectrum from. That is a geopolitical headache for Britain to try to resolve if it goes ahead," he said.

majorp
majorp
01 Dec 2018 18:08

@Lynne. There is plenty of money and think of the jobs it will create.

Lynne
Lynne
01 Dec 2018 20:29

@majorp

I thought this country didn't have any money to spare ( and purleease do not start on about Brexit dividend tosh).  And note the last two paragraphs of my post above.     

majorp
majorp
04 Dec 2018 20:31

When people come here and are prepared to spend vast sums just to stay (one hotel in London commands £20,000 per night) then that is mega bucks and the tax that is paid on such sums is mega and the money they spend is mega and the tax paid on those that spend vast sums is mega.

If brexit means loosing inter -planatary agreememts, then so be it. We can do it our selves. Look at the inventions that have been born in this country. I could go on but I would be wasting time.

If jobs are to be lost, it will not be because of brexit. There have been jobs lost in this country before brexit. There will be 80,000 jobs lost in Scotland because of brexit - how do they know that and what jobs are they talking about?

We voted to come out, and it seems to me the deal we have on the table is the best we are going to get. We can't go back to the EU and ask for a new deal.

And how much did this government pay the DUP?

Comment Please sign in or sign up to post