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General Discussion

flo
flo
10 Dec 2015 19:25

New signage and barriers are now on the sea wall.  The signs ask for dogs to be on a lead and indicate no cycling, roller blading, skateboarding or scooter riding.  Dawlish Museum has posted some pics on Facebook for those who have access -

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=910669729040330&id=365561793551129

2 Agrees
BEE9
BEE9
11 Dec 2015 11:00

I noticed the barriers a couple of nights ago, thanks to those who were involved in this project. It may not stop those ignorant people who cycle along the sea path and put everyone else at risk, but at least they have no excuse not for seeing the signs. I will feel more inclined to voice my opinion to those cyclists who decide to flaunt said signs from now on.

5 Agrees
flo
flo
11 Dec 2015 11:52

Express and echo are useless.  They have an article today about how the museum has erected these behind their building.  I do wonder sometimes!

Lynne
Lynne
11 Dec 2015 13:39

Does anyone know if anything of a similar structure has been placed at the Dawlish Warren end?

stephen15
stephen15
12 Dec 2015 11:06

I noticed there Is one next to railway line opposite Marine Parade.

ZIGGY
ZIGGY
12 Dec 2015 11:44

There is a sign at the bottom of the Charlton steps, but none at the bottom of the Rockstone steps so if you approach the beach via those steps you would be oblivious to the warnings. I did see a cyclist riding on the wall towards Dawlish from the Warren so thought maybe  no signs at the Warren, as i past Red Rock i saw this one.

 

New signs along the sea wall 005

Mrkwillms30
Mrkwillms30
25 Oct 2016 09:15

I like the photo of the cycle barrier near Rockstone. Pity  it doesn't exist.

Please listen to my story before your Cyclophobia kicks in.

Last weekend my wife and I (retired) tried to cycle along the sea wall from Dawlish Warren - no as you'll see later we are not lycra louts - we got as far ar the Rockstone cafe when a lady rushed out and virtually pushed my wife off of her bike thrusting a newspaper cutting at her. When I caught up with her and read the cutting I couldn't make it out what it was saying  (despite having a first class degree from Oxbridge) and tried to talk with the lady who disappeared back into the cafe and tried to ignore me.

We now know that cycling isn't permitted on the wall, and we are the last people to want to do something illegal, we simply didn't know. Eventually, seeing I wanted to understand what she felt was so important, she did talk but was incredulous that we hadn't seen "all the signs". When we went back the way that we had come (suitably chastised) we looked hard for signs and it is true we did find one (sadly it was facing out to sea), and definitely no gate like the one shown.
She helpfully told us that there was a flat route to Dawlish on the far side of the railway, approached through the car park (she knew it was flat both ways because she uses it frequently). Clearly, our definitions of flat differ. I struggled up the hill towards Dawlish pushing most of the way. But coming back East Cliff Road (clue in the name maybe) was totally beyond me. I had to wait for a bus to the Warren, pick up my car and then retrieve my bike.
"What a wimp" I hear you cry. Yes, your probably right, but I was not always so. A probably very busy motorist turning right didn't see my motorbike and I ended up in and ITU with four breaks in my pelvis a broken hip and a broken back. I have struggled for three years to get to my current state of wimpishness. Key to that was deciding that I was going to get out of a mobility scooter. Walking any distance was very tough but gentle cycling was a life saver. I can only cycle on fairly flat surfaces (not East Cliff Road!) and I reach a dizzy speed of 6 miles an hour (slower than most leisure runners and some children on scooters. Agh!). I do understand the risks unthinking cyclists must pose on the wall (especially in the summer when it's crowded) but the irony is that had I remained in my scooter (capable of 15mph and wider than a bike) no one would question me using the wall. Not all disabilities are immediately visible. Not all cyclists are lycra louts, for some it is a matter of life or being shut in.

We live near to one of the premier cycle routes in the country. It shares it's width with a stream railway, so the amount left for cyclists and pedestrians is far narrower than the Dawlish wall. Sure there are problems sometimes, mostly with the would be Olympic hopeful cyclists in training, but most of the time it works just fine.

The need to remove this gate (presumably to allow the lady to drive her van up to the cafe, regardless of pedestrians/buggies/dogs etc) which shows how there has to be give and take in the way this path is used. Perhaps, when people have to cut us some slack to make life workable, it should teach us that we need to listen to what might be an issue for others too.
For every problem there's a simple answer, and chances are it's wrong.

2 Agrees
DEEDOODLE
DEEDOODLE
25 Oct 2016 11:51

@Mrkwillms30 - the sea wall is a dangerous place to walk due to the height and no barrier, i appreciate your position, but no cycling means no cycling. i agree the signs need to be prominent and visable to all. in the case of the entrance to the sea wall from dawlish railway viaduct towards dawlish warren it would seem some idiot took them off some time ago, although there is a tiny round one about six feet up a pole.

As to people with disabilities in getting along the sea wall, I have no objection in the use of mobility scooters, wheel chairs, etc as long as they are driven, pushed with the thought of others safety in mind.

As to the signs in general, which are there to stop the minority of ignorant people cycling along the wall, they just don't work because ignorant people will ignore the signs even when they are clearly visable.

Enforcement is the only proven way to stop people flaunting the rules and that means feet on the street and that costs so it doesnt happen. Those in charge just put up more signs and restrictions for the majority of people who do abide by the rules.

 

1 Agree
tom
tom
25 Oct 2016 12:19

@DEEDOODLE - why is it ok for people with disabilities to use mobility scooters but not bicycles?

Is it the extra wheels that makes it better?  

 

1 Agree
Carer
Carer
25 Oct 2016 18:45

@tom

You dont see disabillity scooters racing along and dodging people who are walking along the sea wall

Let's not forget that there is a lovely new (unused) cycle path from the warren into Dawlish now, so the cyclists can use that.

6 Agrees
Pete
Pete
25 Oct 2016 20:33

You dont see disabillity scooters racing along and dodging people who are walking along the sea wall  !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Yes you do . They are a bloody pain in the arse. Ban them all.

2 Agrees
wilfordlad
wilfordlad
25 Oct 2016 23:22

Pete I like to see you repeat that if you HAD to use a disability scooter to get about then you would really know what a bloody pain in the arse is 

3 Agrees
DEEDOODLE
DEEDOODLE
26 Oct 2016 09:14

@tom (25 oct 2016 12:19) the signs specifically state no cycling, if you are capable of cycling then you can walk with the bike along that stretch. yes, scooters are more stable than 2 wheel cycles, obviously!

I, for one, do not want a person or group of cyclist's trying to barge past me on the sea wall on their inherently unstable cycles.  If a disabled scooter came past I would, out of courtesy, move out the way.

1 Agree
Merlin228
Merlin228
26 Oct 2016 09:36

Much of the problem is not about the mode of transport ie. cycle or mobility scooter but todays attitude of those who use them. Yes there are many stories of bad cyclist and scooter users who seem to think they can just run anyone off the path/road because it suits them, then there is the others who know how to act correctly and civilized towards others and the environment thier in. As to "Pete" ban them all attitude my wife would happily swap her mobility scooter/wheelchair with his ability to walk along the wall one more time, for some there is no choice but we are happy to wait, pull to one side for families with baby buggy's, dog walkers and the likes. It only takes a bit of common sense to know the dangers of being to close to edge of the wall and respect other users not abuse them.

1 Agree
ShyTalk 47
ShyTalk 47
26 Oct 2016 14:19

Can anyone compose a sign banning lycra-clad (but maybe quite intelligent) urban terrorists but allowing the slower, amiable, considerate pedal-pushers?  How on earth could one be enforced?  And is the act all that different to riding along a canal towpath?

There were railings on the shore side of the repaired concrete wall last year.  Now they're gone.  Although their remains are visible flush with the ground.  Anyone know why?      There, they're and their - wow, all correctly used in one line?!!  Congratulations to my old English language teacher.

Mmmmmm
Mmmmmm
26 Oct 2016 15:28

Why don't we just ban people and dogs on the wall...........and perhaps ban birds as they pooh..... Oh and dead whales as well.  That really smelt foul. Oh and lastly can we ban waves its it cost so much to repair the wall last time!  there you go problem solved!

 

Personally I dont have an issue with bikes, skate boards, roller blades etc. I take risks every time I leave my front door. If they want to cycle let them, and let them enjoy it!

Margaret Swift
Margaret Swift
26 Oct 2016 23:24

Just a point of accuracy, mobility scooters are also banned from the seawall following accidents  last year when two came off the wall and landed on the beach in a very short space of time.  Like it or not, the  only safe way to traverse the wall is on foot!

5 Agrees
Eugmauran
Eugmauran
27 Oct 2016 10:18

is it legal to ban mobility scooters? I think the sign says not suitable 

 

Pete
Pete
27 Oct 2016 19:00

When they are driven by idiots yes they should be banned . Most of them are driven by fat lazy people who are not even disabled .

3 Agrees
Margaret Swift
Margaret Swift
27 Oct 2016 21:14

I think the sign said no cycling, motor scooters etc but as someone nicked it I can't be absolutely sure. 

Eugmauran
Eugmauran
29 Oct 2016 11:37

I don't disagree with you Pete (I think should only be available through prescription after training and should be insured) but the The Equality Act 2010 calls this the duty to make reasonable adjustments network rail could be compelled to make it  accessible

 

1 Agree
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